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We Learn…

We Learn…
10% of what we read
20% of what we hear
30% of what we see
50% of what we see and hear
70% of what we discuss
80% of what we experience
95% of what we teach others.

–Though often ascribed to William Glasser this quote was probably somehow derived from the many learning pyramids out there that were in themselves derived one way or another from Edgar Dale’s “Cone of Experience;” 1946. Dale did not ascribe numerical values to different learning modalities. These were added in the sixties by some hack in the Texas oil industry.

…apprenticeship…

Games may therefore provide a context for apprenticeship in the use of language in ‘protected’ and ‘semi-authentic’ settings.

–Serious Games in Language Learning and Teaching – A Theoretical Perspective
by Birgitte Holm Sørensen and Bente Meyer The Danish University of Education

…benefiting students…

The justification for using games in the classroom has been well demonstrated as benefiting students in a variety of ways. These benefits range from cognitive aspects of language learning to more co-operative group dynamics.’

–M. Martha Lengeling and Casey Malarcher
‘Forum’ Vol. 35 No 4, October – December 1997.

…real world context…

…games bring real world context into the classroom, and enhance students’ use of English in a flexible, communicative way

–Nguyen Thi Thanh Huyen and Khuat Thi Thu Nga
‘Asian EFL Journal’ – December 2003.

…without stress…

Through playing games, students can learn English the way children learn their mother tongue without being aware they are studying; thus without stress, they can learn a lot.

–Yin Yong Mei and Jang Yu-jing
Daejin University ELT Research Paper. Fall, 2000.

…generate fluency.

[Games] motivate learners, promote communicative competence, and generate fluency.

–by Agnieszka Uberman
‘Forum’ Vol. 36 No 1, January – March 1998.

…stimulation and simulation…

Games have been understood as a serious and pervasive element for providing stimulation and simulation in instructional settings.

–Serious Games in Language Learning and Teaching – A Theoretical Perspective
by Birgitte Holm Sørensen and Bente Meyer The Danish University of Education

 

…provide structure…

Games provide structure for interactions, reward students for collaborating and problem solving, and promote cooperative learning, individual accountability, positive interdependence, and the need for group processing and feedback.

Games as an Interactive Classroom Technique: Perceptions of Corporate Trainers, College Instructors and Students
by Rita Kumar and Robin Lightner
University of Cincinnati’s Raymond Walters College.

 

…reach and engage…

…games provide a way to reach and engage students who may have a variety of learning styles.

Games as an Interactive Classroom Technique: Perceptions of Corporate Trainers, College Instructors and Students
by Rita Kumar and Robin Lightner
University of Cincinnati’s Raymond Walters College.

…intense and meaningful…

If it is accepted that games can provide intense and meaningful practice of language, then they must be regarded as central to a teacher’s repertoire. They are thus not for use solely on wet days and at the end of term!

Games for Language Learning.
by Wright, A., Betteridge, D., & Buckby M.
Cambridge University Press; 1984

As long…

As long as people have been playing games, people have been laughing and learning.

A Not So Trivial Pursuit
by Wendy Magahay-Jobnson
TESL Canada Journal; Volume 2, Issue 2, 1985

…highly motivating…

Games are highly motivating since they are amusing and at the same time challenging. Furthermore, they employ meaningful and useful language in real contexts. they also encourage and increase cooperation.

Six Games for the EFL/ESL Classroom
by Aydan Ersöz
Internet TESL Journal; Vol. VI, No. 6, June 2000